ABORIGINAL ARTS LONDON UK
 

 
Aboriginal Artefacts

AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL ARTEFACTS

Aboriginal art has firmly established itself internationally, attracting serious art collectors and investors who appreciate the beautiful rich cultural heritage of Aboriginal Australians. Authentic Aboriginal artefacts, especially items of a religious or ceremonial nature, are in very high demand. However, Aboriginal Arts Ltd. makes a clear statement that it would not sell, or condone the selling, of any Aboriginal artefact which was deemed to be of particular high cultural importance and to which any indigenous Australian tribal group contended was their rightful heritage.

With the globally increasing interest in Aboriginal art there are many copy and imitation artefacts, yidaki and didgeridoos. However, with some careful research of the seller and the item offered for sale, you should be able to avoid mistaking a genuine Aboriginal artefact for a copy item, which was produced for the tourist market or for the unsuspecting collector.

Aboriginal Bullroarers are often spun above the head of an Australian Aborigine before sacred ceremony as the 'unearthly' sound produced serves both as a warning for the uninitiated to keep clear and to 'cleanse' the area before ceremony. Sought after genuine Aboriginal bullroarers are usually finely incised and have developed a nice patina on the surface from handling over time. Message boards and churingas were usually inscribed in a somewhat similar fashion and are considered to be of high cultural significance. However, some recent 'sacred Aboriginal artefacts' have appeared on the market with the surface treated with an oil so as to give a false impression of patina and an incorrect indication of age.

The tools which an Aboriginal Australian used varied by group and locality, for instance, not all Australian Aborigines had boomerangs. However, most indigenous Aborigines had knives, scrapers, axe-heads, spears, various vessels for eating and drinking, and digging sticks. A primary tool used in hunting is the spear, which is launched by a woomera or spear-thrower.

Aboriginal boomerangs are of various types and shapes and not all were made for returning, and some of these boomerangs are called killing sticks, and others were crafted for ceremonial purposes and held whilst dancing or struck together like bilma or clapsticks.

Aboriginal Shields were skillfully crafted and used in ceremonies, dances and occasionally in defensive combat. The narrowest shields were usually used in hand-to-hand combat while large, broad shields protected the holder against spears and other missiles. The largest and most spectacular shields were made by the rainforest peoples of north Queensland, which were carefully painted with clan designs and adorned with stunning colours.

Sometimes our Aboriginal artefacts are sold before we have a chance to upload images and details on the Internet; should you require something 'special' please enquire and we will do our utmost to obtain what you are looking for!


Please click on the thumbnails below for further details and pricing.



AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL SHIELD

Queensland Rainforest Shield


AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL ARTEFACT

Old Groote Eylandt Bullroarer


AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL ARTEFACT

Ex-McAlpine Ceremonial Morning Star Pole

AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL CLAPSTICKS

Vintage Bilma - Clapsticks


AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL ARTEFACT

Ex-McAlpine Ceremonial Morning Star Pole


AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL CLAPSTICKS

Arnhem Land Clapsticks


AUTHENTIC ABORIGINAL ARTEFACT

Djalu & Elcho Island Dancers Morning Star Pole


 


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